Slab Gallery visits are by appointment only
Know More
Hilltop Surfaces Logo
Do Engineered quartz countertops stain?
Engineered quartz surfaces are stain resistant, but not stain proof. Certain substances such as food dye, and spices like turmeric are likely to leave stains, even after a thorough cleaning and wiping of the surface.
How can I prevent stains on my countertop?
As with any surface, simple preventative measures can be taken to protect countertops. Always wipe up spills and moisture as quickly as possible; prevent etching and stains by religiously using cutting boards, trivets, and coasters.

Acidic products are common in the kitchen, specifically when caring for marble surfaces, wipe off immediately substances including tomatoes, citrus fruits, juices, alcohol, vinegar, red wine and oil.

Keep all bottles and containers on a dish, including dish detergent, to prevent residues touching the surface of the countertop. Constantly dry the underneath off anything placed on the countertop, and wipe off water around the faucet and fixtures; water will calcify and though it is cleanable using a neutral cleaner once a week, it is also preventable.
How to clean a granite countertop?
Wipe up your granite countertop after each use with a neutral cleaner, read the label to identify a cleaner safe for stone surfaces. Avoid using dish detergent since it leaves a greasy film, which can dull or leave streaks on stone surfaces.

Keep all bottles and containers on a dish, including dish detergent, to prevent residues touching the surface of the countertop. Constantly dry the underneath off anything placed on the countertop, and wipe off water around the faucet and fixtures; water will calcify and though it is cleanable using a neutral cleaner once a week, it is also preventable.
How to clean a quartzite countertop?
Cleaning a quartzite countertop is similar to caring for a granite one. Use a soft cloth or a paper towel to wipe up counters regularly with a gentle cleanser and water. Remember to avoid using dish detergent since it leaves a greasy film, which can dull or leave streaks on stone surfaces.

Keep all bottles and containers on a dish, including dish detergent, to prevent residues touching the surface of the countertop. Constantly dry the underneath off anything placed on the countertop, and wipe off water around the faucet and fixtures; water will calcify and though it is cleanable using a neutral cleaner once a week, it is also preventable.
How to clean a marble countertop?
When caring for a marble countertop, pay special attention to acidic substances including tomatoes, citrus fruits, juices, alcohol, vinegar, red wine and oil; wipe off all of these immediately to avoid ending up with an etch or a burn mark.

Prevent etching and stains by religiously using cutting boards, trivets, and coasters. Clean marble countertops on a daily basis with a soft cloth or a paper towel and stone cleaner or mild soap, avoid dish soap.

Keep all bottles and containers on a dish, including dish detergent, to prevent residues touching the surface of the countertop. Constantly dry the underneath off anything placed on the countertop, and wipe off water around the faucet and fixtures; water will calcify and though it is cleanable using a neutral cleaner once a week, it is also preventable.
How to choose which stone to use?
All types of stone have certain colours and patterns associated to them, this is often the first factor that people look at when deciding which stone to purchase. Although this is important for the achievement of a design, it is crucial to consider the rest of the attributes of a stone.

Particularly natural stones tend to have fissures, spots and pits; that look differently in certain positions or light conditions. Beware that these natural flaws will potentially not go away with a sealer. Sealers are designed to impregnate on the stone and to be absorbed, not to fill voids. Therefore, when shopping for a stone, insist on looking closely on different angles and with appropriate lighting.

Another important aspect to consider when selecting a stone is the application. Different applications require different technical characteristics such as weight, hardness and resistance. The application will also define the level and frequency of care to provide to the stone surface in order to prevent etching and scratching.
Why choose granite for my countertop?
Sustainability: Since granite does create naturally, it can be considered as a renewable resource; however, the process takes thousands of years. Granite countertops can last a lifetime, they do not contain harmful chemicals and do not emit harmful radiation or gasses, which place them in the green building movement.

Heat Resistance: Granite is currently one of the most heat-resistant materials for countertops. You may place a hot plate or pan directly on your granite countertop surface and it won’t cause any damage. Although, it is recommended to use a trivet when placing hot objects on your countertop for long periods of time.

Scratch Resistance: Scoring a seven out of 10 on Moh’s scale of hardness, granite is fairly resistant to scratching. It is recommended to always use chopping boards when cutting anything on the countertop, but in order to protect the sharpness of the knife, since granite will dull your knives and possibly leave a metal residue on the countertop that could be difficult to remove.


Resistance to Chemicals: Granite countertops are deemed to be very resistant to chemicals. Acids and bases will not harm a granite surface. You should be careful about the frequency of use, since the repeated use of chemicals might wash away the sealer after a certain period, resulting in the need for re-sealing the surface before the due time.

Stain Resistance: In general, darker granites are very dense and sometimes there isn’t a requirement for a sealer. On the other hand, lighter granites are more porous, which make them prone to stains, requiring multiple coats of sealer to be considered stain resistant. Whichever the case, if properly treated, granite will make a great stain-resistant countertop surface.

Sealing. Granite: is a porous material. Most fabricators will apply a sealer to granite countertops before they are installed which will protect them from absorbing liquids too quickly. Being porous is not necessarily a bad quality. If liquids are left on the surface for long periods of time, they will eventually absorb. But just like they absorb, they will also evaporate. Depending on what the substance is that needs to be removed, you can apply different poultices to speed the process along. However, many will evaporate on their own without the use of chemicals or cleaning products.

Maintenance: Granite countertops are considered to be a low maintenance countertop surface. The likelihood of needing to be repaired or resurfaced is low. Technology for sealers has come a long way over the years, and many will last more than 10 years before needing to be reapplied. When they do need to be reapplied, it is something that most homeowners can do on their own as the process is similar to cleaning. Simply apply the product and wipe off the excess. It is a good idea to ask your installer which sealer was initially applied and use the same kind to reapply. Some sealers don’t play nicely with each other and when mixed, can create a sticky mess.

Colour Availability: Since granite is a natural stone, we are limited to the colors and patterns that originate from the earth’s natural processes. Granite tends to have less variety of patterns and colours than other stones.Flowing waves and patterns will not be well represented in a sample, be sure to look at the exact slab that will be used in your project so you get the right image.

What is the Difference Between Natural Quartz (Quartzite) and Engineered Quartz?
Quartzite on one hand, contains minerals and nothing else. Quartz, the mineral, is the main ingredient. A quartzite stone is 100% natural and comes directly from the earth, made from geologic processes, over millions of years. Some types of quartzite contain smaller amounts of other minerals that give the stone color and character. The most well-known quartzite quarries are located in Brazil, though there are quarries along the planet including in Canada, India, Italy, Norway, and Sweden. Conditions such as the depth at which quartz is formed and the time it spends under the earth defines how porous a quartzite is, resulting in the conditions it can endure.

On the other hand, even though the name “quartz” refers to a natural mineral, engineered quartz (sometimes referred to as “engineered stone”) is a manmade stone. It’s the product of bonding quartz particles together with resin, pigments, and other ingredients; in a mold. Manufactured quartz is made in factories in the United States, Europe, and Asia, among other locations. The mix in the mold is put under vacuum conditions, vibration, and pressure; this process is called “compaction by vibrocompression vacuum process.” The slabs are compressed at around 30 pounds per square inch, and heated up to 360° (around 180° C)F for around 40 minutes. The heat and pressure used to manufacture a slab are by far minor than the conditions that happen in nature.

Due to the use of resin, engineered quartz results in having low porosity, nonetheless, this makes engineered quartz softer than natural quartzite.

For application purposes, quartzite can be used indoors and outdoors indistinctly. From countertops and flooring, to outdoor kitchens and cladding. Weather conditions and UV light won’t affect the surfaces. Engineered quartz is best for using indoors. The resins used in engineered stone, after exposed to UV rays for longer periods of time, will turn yellow.


Still, need help?

Get in touch with us about your specific needs for your next project.
Contact us
Subscribe To Our Newsletter
Get Notifications of deals, new products & more!
cross linkedin facebook pinterest youtube rss twitter instagram facebook-blank rss-blank linkedin-blank pinterest youtube twitter instagram